Tuesday, November 29, 2011

November's top 10 communications tips & issues

This was the month to enjoy the bounty of the harvest--and our blog posts made this month a blockbuster harvest, thanks to your reading preferences. That's what created this list of the most popular posts in November:
  1. Tune up your Twitter feed, three ways, our most popular post, must mean we all have fall-feed-cleaning on the brain, right?
  2. Digital consumers of science news, a post on data I wished for in the #sciwri11 plenary, was a late-breaking October post that doubled its readership again in November.
  3. The point where Penn State got caught: Lessons for communicators was the first of what I expect will be many lessons drawn from this scandal. 
  4. Tweeting about food: Why it's smarter than you think must've uncovered a lot of folks who've been wanting to do this. Turns out, it might be strategic for business reasons.
  5. Sharing my notebook on university and higher education PR launched a new resource on the blog: I'm sharing my Evernote notebook on this topic, a collection of articles, examples good and bad, videos and more.
  6. 10 non-endorsement ways to use retweets on Twitter suggests that RTs don't just mean "I like this." You can use them strategically, too.
  7. A gift from ifttt: How I restored sharing in Google Reader shares my most recent workaround for a useful feature, now gone.
  8. 4 little gifts communicators should give themselves won't break the bank and might bring you joy. And you deserve them.
  9. Long weekend read: My weekly share on Twitter followed the Thanksgiving holiday, proving you do read on the weekends, don't you?
  10. Advice for communications advisers: A timely read shares a resource on how to be a smart and effective giver-of-counsel, something we can all get better at.
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Monday, November 28, 2011

Holiday awareness bloat: Are you serving it to reporters?

You know that overstuffed, bloated feeling you get after the big holiday meal? That "I can't stand another bite of food or I'll be sick" feeling? Good. Then you'll have something in common with reporters on the other end of your (and others') pitches to cover all those special holidays.

You know what I mean: The more than 12,000 special days, weeks and months your organization, industry or other group has sponsored to generate awareness for your organization. It's a PR idea that has worked not wisely, but too well. Consider the day after Thanksgiving, which you thought was just "Black Friday," the big shopping day. But no, it's also Islamic New Year, Saint Catherine's Day, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Buy Nothing Day, Family Day (in Nevada), Maize Day, National Flossing Day, Sinkie Day and (I am not making this up) You're Welcomegiving Day.

NPR reporter Scott Hensley tweeted earlier this month "Has anybody put together a calendar of the days/weeks/month/years of disease awareness?" That would be Chase's Calendar of Events, which offers the 12,000 count for all holidays. His advice to PR people: "look at the awareness bloat to understand why the peg doesn't work so well anymore." That's especially true if, on your special day, there are other holidays in the same subject-matter category, like disease awareness or food or sports.

In my experience working for many fine organizations, those anniversary/holiday days, weeks or months are in the same communications boat as awards: They sound like a fine idea to your organization's executives or members who want to "raise awareness," but don't meet the bar for reporters. The best a communicator can do is urge that the celebrations' goals are primarily internal, as a rallying point for members, employees, customers or volunteers, rather than as a media blitz. Feel free to use Chase's as a guide: If your special holiday is concurrent with a dozen other worthies, or (as did National Chemistry Week when I worked for the chemists' professional society) conflicts with an overwhelming news event like national elections, start reframing those expectations now. You and the reporters covering you will both heave a sigh of relief.

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Friday, November 25, 2011

Long weekend read: My weekly share on Twitter

Just so you know, this weekly post isn't full of leftovers (unlike your fridge on the day after Thanksgiving here in the U.S.). Instead, I cull the best of the ideas, reads, tips and resources I found and shared on Twitter, where I'm @dontgetcaught--and serve them up for you to read over the weekend. "Making you look smart on Mondays" ought to be the motto. Despite the holiday, this week had plenty of prized items to share, and here they are:
Thanks again for reading the blog--and enjoy your holiday weekend!

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Thursday, November 24, 2011

Thank you!

Readers make this blog and the don't get caught page on Facebook a success. Today is the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday, and I don't want to get caught without telling you how grateful I am to you--you have my thanks today and every day for your part in this adventure. When you read, share, retweet, comment on, and supply tips or leads for posts here, you're helping others make sure they don't get caught unprepared...and you make the blog a richer experience for all of us, me most of all.

I'm also especially grateful for those of you who have allowed me to reprint your great posts, submitted to interviews, or offered guest posts. Thanks so much for adding to our content stash in a concrete way. My hat is permanently tipped to you.

We'll be back tomorrow, posting our usual "weekend read." Today, enjoy your holiday!


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Tuesday, November 22, 2011

4 little gifts communicators should give themselves

Normally the behind-the-scenes folks who help other people get engaging or eloquent or on time for interviews, communicators are the shoemaker's children when it comes to giving themselves things. But I've found four little gifts that you can give yourself, guilt-free--and they're all designed to make you smarter, faster or better at your work. Try these on for size:
  1. Tweet smarts: The newly updated edition of The Twitter Book in paperback, or its Kindle version, which comes out November 28 but is available for pre-order now. It's fully revised and still the best guide on all the ways you can use Twitter, mainly because it includes real tweets as examples (and those are new, too). Great as a primer, and useful for the cognoscenti, it's full of real examples, smart tactics and no-nos. 
  2. Presentation prescience: The Backchannel: How Audiences are Using Twitter and Social Media and Changing Presentations Forever is still the best guide to that mashup that's your presentation and the audience's real-time posting. If you haven't taken the time to think that through, this is your short course.
  3. Newfangled business cards you'll actually like: I've got a variety of business cards and greeting cards from MOO.com, and the people I hand them too are always admiring the paper stock, colors, sizes and designs. They can work with your corporate designs or serve as your designer, add in QR codes or photos, and even give you a pack of cards each with its own image. Use my MOO referral code and give them a whirl.
  4. For that next power-outage emergency: The Duracell Powerhouse Charger, which comes with a USB and mini-USB cable, can juice your phone, tablet or other device during one of those natural disasters we seem to keep having. After this year's hurricane, I stocked up (and at almost 70 percent off, you can hand these out like candy in the office). 
The best gift to yourself if you're a communicator? More training for you, whether it's in handling media interviews, revving up your presentation or speaking skills, or advancing your social media tactics. Email me at info[at]dontgetcaught[dot]biz if those are on your wish list.

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Monday, November 21, 2011

Tweeting about food: Why it's smarter than you think

"I don't want to join Twitter and find out what you ate for lunch."

It's the universal dismissal of Twitter, the suggestion that we only post about what we just ate, as if that were the consummate waste of a reader's time, let alone the poster's time. Why would you want to lallygag around like that?

Right, because you don't ever talk about food at work, home or in between. You don't eat a big breakfast when you're facing a long work day, make deals over lunch, or steal candy from the office jar. You don't line up at that trendy food truck on lunch break, or hit the bar around the corner because their happy hour sliders make your heart sing. You're not dieting or quitting a diet. You don't cook or let others cook for you. You don't ask for seconds, special-order, takeout. You don't gather around the holiday board with your loved ones. No sirree, not you. All business, you are. Without food touching it.

I'm on to those anti-food-tweeters, because that diss sounds like all the other automatic dismissals of Twitter by people who are too afraid to try it--they're just making food the roadkill, so to speak, with a little side-diss of you and your overall tweeting for good measure.

Truth is, not everyone tweets about food. But those who do are accomplishing all sorts of useful and often businesslike, even profitable, things that you're not. And yes, I am one of them. Why? Food might just be the One True Social Media Topic, because it does so many things you already want and need to accomplish in social media circles. Food:
  • Is a universal connector: It's considered one of the most basic needs of humankind, something your stomach tells you on a regular basis. That opens you up to more conversations, being relevant as it is to more people. (You do want to connect and have conversations on social media, right?) Choosing food as one of your topics is as good a bet as any that others will start a chat with you--everyone can relate to food, no matter their position. It works at cocktail parties and networking events, and it works on Twitter. As points of entry go, it's easy. 
  • Gets as complex and intellectual as you wish: Go read what food writer Ruth Reichl's having for breakfast. I dare you. Then engage with Mark Bittman or Marion Nestle on food politics and research. Lately, I'm getting 140-character recipes from master chefs Marcus Samuelsson and Eric Ripert that I can put to use in the kitchen. What you got? That's serious food.
  • Invites information-sharing: A tweet about what you're eating might let me ask for the recipe or a restaurant recommendation, bring me around the corner to your office to see if you'll share, let me tell you about a better/worse/made-by-me dish, discover we both like liver and onions or something else we have in common. (I once worked in an office in which no fewer than six of us turned out to like liver and onions, and we had a memorable lunch of the same that bonded us forever--the few, the proud.)
  • Adds dimension: If you're mostly all-business on Twitter, posting about what or where you're eating lets us see more about you, layering on perspective that makes you multi-dimensional. So much the better if you have a special take on food, whether you cook it, eat it or choose wines to go with it. Even sharing special meals--you're off to an anniversary dinner or have just been honored at a banquet--helps us know you better.
  • Provides an ongoing source of topics: You'll be eating every day, won't you, so you'll have an ever-unfolding array of content if you choose to tweet about food. Food can lead to all sorts of conversational avenues (are you eating, cooking, delivering, producing, inspecting, describing?) as well, which further expands your content options.
  • Cements business deals: My food tweeting--mostly about what I'm cooking--has ferreted out every client or potential client of mine on Twitter who likes to cook or eat well. That means we have more in common, and more reasons to talk. You can keep your cold calls and mailers, my friend. Over here, we're swapping recipes and plotting good meals for the next time we're in the same city. Food-tweeting can lead easily to meetings in real life, and I guarantee the food-tweeter will enjoy better meals on travel, thanks to Twitter pals (yes, @egculbertson, I'm looking at you).
  • If you wish, limits what you share, on safe ground: Being a universal topic also makes food a safe one. I often advise new tweeters who want to balance personal and professional topics on Twitter to pick three personal topics they'd talk to anyone about at a business cocktail party or before a meeting, and food might well be one of them. You can show yourself to be a person, not a bot, more effectively that way. I do it with food, travel and music, myself.
  • Is more than a tweet: As with any social medium, you shouldn't mistake the medium for the content.  People tweet about food because they enjoy making it and eating it, and sometimes, sharing it because they delight in it, want to complain about it, or hope you'll join them. Breaking bread isn't about the breaking, but the bread--and coming together to do it.
If those of us who tweet about food want reassurance, there's the warm and newly open kitchen of Dinnerlist, a new social site that lets you share what you ate for dinner, along with recipes, food experiments and more in open or closed groups you create. Chef Faye Hess of the FayeFood blog--one of my favorite food writers--is behind it. Ready to stop dissing and start tweeting? Next week sees the debut of the updated second edition of The Twitter Book, the best guide going. Pre-order it now. You can find me on Twitter as @dontgetcaught.

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Friday, November 18, 2011

Weekend read: My weekly share on Twitter, with favorites

Did lightning strike this week--in a good way? Here's hoping you didn't get hit, but had your best work illuminated. Lots of sparks flew on Twitter this week, where I'm @dontgetcaught. Here's the best of what I shared there this week:
What a week! I appreciate your readership, tips and feedback, as always. Enjoy your weekend...

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Thursday, November 17, 2011

Advice for communications advisers: A timely read

Especially in the wake of the Penn State child sex abuse scandal, smart communicators are raising difficult issues with their leaders...and many are wondering whether their advice would be taken in just such a tough circumstance. That's why I was especially happy to see an article that couldn't been more timely for communications directors to read and share.

"Advice for the Adviser," by Tufts University law professor Jeswald Salacuse, targets the negotiator, but the advice works perfectly for communicators, whether you're on staff or a consultant or gun-for-hire. Salacuse offers five rules for advisers. Under "Help, or at least do no harm," he notes an important exception with a great tale:
It’s worth noting as well that on occasion, the best way to help may be to cause a little pain. When Lyndon Johnson was deciding whether to seek reelection in the face of antiwar protests, one advisor told him, “You can run, Mr. President, but the only places you’ll be able to campaign are Fort Bragg and the aircraft carrier Enterprise.” Johnson chose not to run.
The article draws on his book, The Wise Advisor: What Every Professional Should Know About Consulting and Counseling,a paperback (with the Kindle edition here).(My copy's already loaded on the Kindle.) I learned about the book from the very good blog of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, one of my favorite training resources.

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Tuesday, November 15, 2011

November's For Communications Directors newsletter out tomorrow

The year's almost over--maybe that's why this month is packed with news, issues and activity? So is the November issue of For Communications Directors newsletter, out tomorrow. You'll find a trove of resources to get you through the rest of this year and early 2012, including:
  • new workshops for communicators, on working with experts, on public speaking and a lunch session on social media tuneups;
  • this month's free download on how communications directors can reinforce my training sessions after I've gone, and
  • access to one of my notebooks of sources, videos, articles and more--the first in a series made available to you for free.
The newsletter also includes links to important posts in the past month, training resources and much more. Not a subscriber? Sign up today at the link below to make sure you don't miss this issue--and please pass that link along to your colleagues.

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Monday, November 14, 2011

Sharing my notebook on university and #highered PR

With the Penn State child abuse scandals taking up so much of my reading and discussions in the past week--like anyone else who works closely with universities on communications issues--I found myself reacting in real time, sending private tweets and emails, and often sharing items publicly. "Seen this?" "What do you think of this?" And I wrote my first post on this scandal, The point where Penn State got caught: Lessons for communicators, including some of my gleanings and readings.

I keep an Evernote notebook on university PR topics, my way of collecting videos, coverage, topics, tweets and other material that I can use as examples and cautionary tales when I conduct leadership media training sessions or help universities develop social media strategies. By no means comprehensive, it's a collection in which I keep track of major news and perspectives on crisis topics and other issues likely to come up in my training sessions.

Now I'm sharing that notebook publicly. You can find my Evernote notes on university PR topics here, and use these features to make it even more useful:
  • A search box lets you search the entire notebook; it's upper left on the page.
  • Tags are Evernote's automated tags for some of the URLs or sources where I found the notes; I haven't added any particular tags to this notebook as yet.
  • If you want to add this notebook to your Evernote account, click on the "Link to my account" button at upper right on the page.
  • Print notes or the entire notebook, heaven help you, using the button at far right on the top of the page.
In addition to external sources, I've annotated many of the notes to share my perspective on what's significant about a piece of coverage or the university's handling of it, or where the good or bad example lies. Of course, this week, I've added lots of coverage of the Penn State scandal and investigation. Look for these gems in the coverage--all in the notebook:
  • An ESPN reporter's look back at a previous sex discrimination case at Penn State, focused on a women's coach who allegedly discriminated against lesbian players. Her description of a press officer's half-hearted handling of inquiries about the case offers lessons for any university PR team.
  • Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett's press conference last week, a great example of demonstrating leadership, deft handling of a news conference, and managing to contribute to the discussion even when most of his comments had to be withheld due to the ongoing state investigation, which he launched while attorney general. He does a great job explaining the process in this presser.
  • One PR observer, Ed Cafasso, points to the next potential shoe to drop: Reports that the alleged abuser was running a prostitution ring involving the children. He also points to a good article on sports fan psychology and wonders whether Penn State can eventually detach its sports program from the ongoing investigation in the minds of the public.
I've also added two notes at the top of the notebook: One to introduce it, and another with all the posts from this blog that mention universities. The latter includes many examples of my clients' work, social media strategies, media training issues and more, and clicking on that link ensures you'll find the updated array of my posts related to higher education issues. Finally, the notebook is updated whenever I add or change a note--a great way for you to stay current. Let me know if your university communications operation is seeking media training, crisis communications training, or social media strategy help, at info[at]dontgetcaught[dot]biz.

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Friday, November 11, 2011

Weekend read: My weekly share on Twitter

Did you make hay this week? I hope the sun was shining on your efforts...and that you're ready for the weekend. This week, there was plenty of hay-making on Twitter, where I'm @dontgetcaught. Here's the best of the finds, reads and resources I shared there in the past week:
What a week! Thanks for taking the time to read the blog. Don't forget: If there's an issue you think I should be covering, please share it with me at info[at]dontgetcaught[dot]biz. My best tips come from readers...

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Wednesday, November 09, 2011

The point where Penn State got caught: Lessons for communicators

Not too long ago, I conducted a media training in which we looked at this video (also embedded below) of the University of Florida's president in a news conference the day after the "Don't taze me, bro" incident in which campus police used a taser on a vocal student in an open meeting. That presser is a great example of how to handle an organizational firestorm, which is why I use it in trainings. And it's the opposite, so far, of the approach being taken this week at Penn State, where a longtime football coach is alleged to have repeatedly abused young boys participating in a charity he founded for underserved youth.

I'm not a lawyer, so the point at which I see organizations getting caught has nothing to do with the moments that involve indictments, handcuffs or prosecution. Instead, organizations (and their executives) get caught, in my mind, long before that point, and the Penn State case appears to open a window on precisely when that happens. Getting caught happens at the moment when someone with responsibility at any level thinks "No one will find this out, so I don't have to do anything," or something like it. That might come out in your head as "I did my part, and I don't have any influence on what happens next," "I hope this doesn't get out," "Really, it's a small thing," "This is just sand in my shoe," or "Could it really be that bad?" To which I say, and smart communicators say, in order,
  • "So you'd like to be known as the person who passed the buck when this hits the fan?"
  • "But it will get out--let's assume that, particularly if we adhere to the laws on reporting such things--and what will we say when it does?"
  • "Let me play out for you some scenarios where this becomes something more than a small thing..."
  • "Let's address it substantially before that sand in your shoe becomes a sand dune."
  • "Yes, it could be that bad, and I can't really make it look better."
Before this incident hit the fan, I was about to write a post about communicators in organizations serving as the vice presidents of the unseen but soft underbelly of their companies, universities, government agencies or nonprofits--that thin-ice space in which bad things might and often do happen. It's where good, smart communicators play a crucial role in being able to spot the weakness, point out the public ramifications and perhaps steer the ship away from danger.

It's a role particular to the in-house communicator, one an agency rarely sees firsthand. "What you're about to do is completely legal under these statutes," many lawyers I've worked with would counsel colleagues, "and now Denise will tell you how it will look if you do that." And my followup often would be, "I can only make it look slightly less bad than it really is. Maybe." I like to think we steered folks mostly to the right path, before things like this happened.

The Penn State story is still playing out as I write this post. But I can tell you we are way past the point where I consider the organization to have been caught--that appears to have happened many years ago. Here's the thing: If communicators of responsibility know about these questions when they arise, their most critical role can be influencing what happens next, from a full stop and full disclosure before the problem festers, to the extreme of quitting when smart advice is rejected. And yes, I realize your worst nightmare is the place without the "if" in that sentence. Maybe you don't know. But maybe, you do, even a little. 

Many of my clients, when they see my cautionary tales in training sessions or in blog posts like this one, say something like "We saw that--we all emailed it around and congratulated ourselves that it wasn't us this time."  The way my mind works, I'd take another tack: Events like this week's Penn State debacle should have communicators turning their thoughts to whether their organizations might be next up, and what needs to happen to avoid that.  Here, some steps you might take in such a situation--or better yet, before you find yourself stuck in this kind of quagmire:

  • Use other scandals to ask the difficult questions: It's easy enough to say, "Here's how Company X or University Y is getting slaughtered over this issue--so tell me, do we have anything like this, even being rumored?" Or share some video of the offical pronouncements and ask, "How would we look if this happened here?" You can accurately note that any institution similar to the one under fire will face similar questions from here on out, and urge executives that you need to be ready to answer them.
  • Get your spokesfolks beyond the vertical pronoun:  A crisis of this nature demands going beyond defending yourself. Remind your principals (yes, you must) that their public statements should go beyond "I did what was required of me" to that 30,000-foot point that reminds us they remember the noble goals of the mission. Fight with the attorneys as needed on this score. In the clip below, note that the UF president first talks about academic and First Amendment freedom of speech, and about personal safety--not who-tased-John, not I-didn't-know. He goes to what's really at stake for the community, not why this is all about him. This week, I wish Penn State's leaders had spoken more about the organization, less about whether they as individuals endorsed each other or felt not guilty.
  • Cultivate a culture that questions "How will this look?" Communicators can't do this all by themselves, but they can keep the drumbeat going, be available and keep raising the question until it becomes an expectation. At the first rumor, question or issue arising, start asking this question to focus others. It's not just a tactical question, but one that can push actions--the right kind. In yesterday's New York Times, columnist Frank Bruni put it bluntly, comparing Penn State to similar scandals in the Catholic church and the Boy Scouts, but in a way all communicators should hear: "Institutions do an awful job of policing themselves." Eugene Robinson of the Washington Post walks you through the failure of leadership at Penn State to question itself. Communicators: Make it possible for the questions to be asked by asking them yourselves.
  • When all that hits the fan, consider whether to stop PR as usual: Somewhere in the middle of the firestorm today, Penn State kept issuing feature releases on its athletic program, even as the tsunami of coverage and commentary overwhelmed most channels. As you've seen here before, shutting off your automated and pre-scheduled announcements during such a crisis keeps your even-more-watchful audience from thinking you're out of touch.

Here's a contrast refreshing to watch: Take the time to watch and listen to this video from the UF incident, and mull how this week would have gone had Penn State done something similar in its public statements. I welcome your useful comments on this post and this issue.



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Monday, November 07, 2011

A gift from ifttt: How I restored sharing in Google Reader

In my recent post, Bloggers: Play with ifttt, Evernote and other tools to build a content stash, I wrote about how I've tweaked a few programs' settings to make it easy for me to collect articles I read that might become fodder for my blogs. Last week, I learned that changes in Google Reader--specifically, the dropping of the "share" button--made one of those neat saving tricks obsolete. Iftt (short for "if this, then that") notified me that a task I'd set up would no longer happen, due to the change; I'd arranged it so that any shared items on Google Reader would go into a specific notebook in Evernote, and had already set Google Reader to post my shared items on Twitter. So I was out two automated tasks, bread-and-butter ones for me. With no share button in Reader, my Twitter feed was absent lots of useful articles I wanted to flag for my followers, and I wasn't able to save them where I could find them easily, in Evernote.

But two options for Google Reader tasks remain in ifttt, letting you trigger a task when you star an item or when you tag an item. I've already set up a task that puts starred items into Evernote, and I don't necessarily want to share all of them on Twitter. So I've set up a new task that shares to Twitter any Google Reader item that I tag with a specific tag (mine is "share to Twitter," so novel). Since I've also set up an ifttt task that saves my shared-on-Twitter items to Evernote, those wind up in a notebook automatically. If you're not using starred items for any other purpose, you also can do this task triggered by marking a Google Reader item with a star. Ifttt works with Twitter, Facebook, Facebook pages, blog platforms, feeds and more, so you have a variety of options to choose for your sharing.

So far, it's working, with only a couple of minutes' delay. I'm also using the +1 option to share items from Reader in Google Plus, but sharing to Twitter is an important component of my social sharing strategy. Feels great to have it restored and automatic once again. What are you doing to make up for changes in Google Reader? Share your tips in the comments.

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Friday, November 04, 2011

Weekend read: My weekly share on Twitter

Proud of your accomplishments this week, or coming up short of material with which to impress the office? Look smart, fast, and take in these plentiful finds, reads and resources I shared this week on Twitter, where I'm @dontgetcaught.You can thank me later:
And a great job:
Thanks for reading this week and sharing these resources with your colleagues.

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Thursday, November 03, 2011

Where to catch me: Ragan's 2012 speechwriters conference

I'm pleased that I'll be moderating a panel on women in speechwriting at Ragan's 2012 Speechwriters and Executive Communicators Conference, March 14-16, 2012 here in Washington, DC.  Speechwriting is a profession long dominated by men, but this panel will be packed with some top-notch women in the field, including:
  • Vinca LaFleur, partner at West Wing Writers;
  • Megan Rooney, a speechwriter and policy advisor to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and
  • Jordan Tamagni Schlein, senior advisor for communications to the UNICEF executive director.
Register at the link above--Ragan members get a discount--and let me know if you'll be at this conference so we can meet up. Have questions for the panel, even now? Leave 'em in the comments or email me at info[at]dontgetcaught[dot]biz.

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Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Tune up your Twitter feed, 3 ways

From time to time, you should be looking under the hood of your Twitter feed and practices. After you clean up your list of followers and those you follow, you might want to consider these three ways to tune up your Twitter operations:

  • Reconsider the best timing for your tweets: Mashable's list of the top 5 tools to better time your tweets shares tools that analyze your current Twitter feed to make timing recommendations. (Note that the post says that frequency is just as important as timing.) If your audience is in many time zones, consider posting at odd-to-you hours to build a bigger readership.
  • Front-load the cannon. Or is that canon? ProBlogger's post on writing a year's worth of posts in 30 days relies on a November annual event, National Novel Writing Month (aka NaNoWriMo) to fuel a year's worth of posts. The contest calls for writing a set number of words in a month. Who's to say you can't spend them on tweets?
  • Plan your Twitter path: Social Media Explorer shares how to develop a Twitter workflow that ties all that together, helping you decide ahead of time what to post where and when.
How do you tune up your Twitter feed and practices? Share your ideas in the comments.


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