Sunday, November 29, 2009

Remember November's top 10 tips

Tips, ideas and issues fell like autumn leaves this month, ranging from Twitter backchannels and speakers to camcorder tests and rethinking your communications using events. From the piles, we've raked up the 10-most-read posts from this blog in November:

  1. A speaker's take on the Twitter backchannel looked at one speaker's disastrous presentation--and how a visible Twitterstream behind her made it even worse.  The meltdown made this our most-read post of the month. (Read more about the sexual comments made about the speaker on The Eloquent Woman blog, another popular post.)
  2. Can you learn from the backchannel as a speaker?  I think so--and this post from October still ranks as November's 2nd-most-read item.
  3. And just in time to help you maneuver that backchannel, my post on Olivia Mitchell's new, free ebook for speakers on just that topic vaulted to our number 3 position this month. Timely, and the price is right.  Olivia writes the very good Speaking About Presenting blog, a favorite of mine.
  4. If you don't have RSS feeds on your web-published communications, you're losing a major audience--and making it tougher for them to pull your information to them.   Maybe that's why news of several new feeds from the National Science Foundation's Science 360 aggregator site got so many readers this month.  Take a look at how they sliced their offerings into different, useful feeds.
  5. Figuring out how to brand yourself on social media networking sites?  I've updated my thinking in this post about creating your own "me.com" -- the topic of a talk I gave earlier this year to the Science Writers in New York.  Read this before you need to network or job hunt. As I said in my talk, employers are fickle--social media is your friend.
  6. The first review of the Kodak zi8 ultralight camcorder made its rock-n-roll debut on the blog this month, another reader favorite that lets you see video in action.  Our reviews came to a mysterious halt this month, also.
  7. Sharpening our sense of local news is a post that looks at new trends in "hyperlocal" offerings, whether from news organizations or your organization.  From the post: "You may think of your organization as a multinational corporation, a world-class philanthropy, a major player in national affairs or a widely recognized authority on your subject. But if you miss pinpointing what's under your nose in your location, you'll miss one of the hottest strategies in communications."
  8. In this social-media world, face-to-face events also are getting rebooted and made over. This post may challenge your thinking about how to turn some of your traditional communications--even things like publications--into successful live events.
  9. Must be close to year-end, since my collection of posts on retreat facilitation proved popular this month.  I focus on retreats for communications teams, or for boards and management considering changes in communications.
  10. My utility belt for communications includes actual equipment, social media sites and freebies you should check out and adapt to your own operation's needs.

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